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Stars & Fujifilm Searching for stars

Fujifilm's large binocular telescopes have discovered 15 comets, including Comet Hyakutake.
With advanced lens grinding and lens coating technology, even distant and remote comets are vividly captured.
This optical technology is also utilized in observatory telescopes and artificial satellites. It is mankind's dream to learn more about the universe - Fujifilm strives to make this dream come true.

1.A world-class binocular telescope that has discovered 15 comets

Since 1987, large binocular telescopes mounted with Fujifilm's Fujinon lenses have discovered 15 comets.
A number of them may sound familiar to you, such as Comet Hyakutake, discovered in Japan by Yuji Hyakutake.
Astronomy fans around the world who favor our binocular telescopes search for comets every night.
Comet Hyakutake/Large binocular Fujinon LB150 series (25 x 150 model)
Fujinon lens

2.Optical and lens technology chosen by comet-hunters around the world

The rendition performance, which captures sharp and bright images even at night for a full range of view, is why astronomers around the world choose these binocular telescopes.
The high-performance lens, polished on the surface to a precision of 1/1000 mm, finds comets far, far beyond. Our lens coating technology (EBC coating) reduces light reflection.
By fusing the advanced techniques of our expert craftsmen with the latest technology, we have created binocular telescopes that have excellent light-gathering ability at night and dramatically reduce the bleeding of colors.

3.Telescopes at observatories and artificial satellites covering Earth – you’ll find Fujifilm here too

Observatory telescope
Artificial satellite
For example, our optical technology for highly sensitive cameras is used in huge observatory telescopes*.
Our optical technology is mounted on artificial satellite cameras that observe Earth.
We at Fujifilm support mankind's efforts to gaze into the universe in many ways.

Going to the Moon

Fujifilm lens technology is mounted on the lunar orbit satellite Selene.

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